Django KFIMember Tutorial Part II - Creating Initial Application

 
Django online on Openshift!

Figure I-1 Our Django 1.6 application online on Openshift!

ARTICLE UPDATE : As I have unresolved problem when using Python 3.3 combined with Django 1.6 and PostgrerSQL 9.2 in Openshift, I dropped Python 3.3 requirement and rework this application using Python 2.7 instead.

Previously I had laid out the foundations of what Django application we are about to be build. Have a quick read again on what are those foundations. For now, let start with creating our application from scratch.

We will start by creating a Python 3.3 project on Openshift, prepare local Windows environment for it and then import it into a new Python Tools for Visual Studio (PTVS) project. Lastly, we will also prepare our local environment for Linux user, so that for those who prefer to use *nix environment will be able to follow along this tutorial series.

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Django KFIMember Tutorial Part I - Deciding Application Scope, Production and Technology Stacks

If this is your first encounter with PTVS, I bet you haven't imagine this kind of screenshot, even in your wildest dreams.

If this is your first encounter with PTVS, I bet you haven't imagine this kind of screenshot, even in your wildest dreams... Cool

ARTICLE UPDATE : As I have unresolved problem when using Python 3.3 combined with Django 1.6 and PostgrerSQL 9.2 in Openshift, I dropped Python 3.3 requirement and rework this application using Python 2.7 instead.

Yes, I know. I haven't finished my Flask Biography Tutorial yet. But I thought I would like to start an initial post of what my next tutorial series would be like. I have several ideas actually, popping from my head of what Python topic (library or framework to be exact) I would like to explore more, which are:

  1. Django : "The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines". I am pretty much sure, no software developers were not intrigued by that tagline! Before diving into Python, I evaluate Ruby on Rails previously. And I got the sense that Django is Python answer to RoR, which is not that untrue.
  2. Pyramid, mainly because previously I got offered for Pyramid based remote job.
  3. Isometric traffic control simulation game build using (probably) XNA + Python for scripting. Why? Because in one occasion where I explained to my 6 years old daughter of what is an Isometric image (after I saw her to be so enthusiast looking at an isometric pixel-art image), she and also her 3 years old brother seems to be interested on it.

    It's so addicted!
    It's so addicted! Try to find Batman in that beautiful pixel art image taken from nasc

  4. Twisted, to be able to develop a large scale of network event-driven application. It may be just a chat server for the aforementioned Isometric traffic control simulation game, or a more complex multiplayer server for it.

Eventually, as I also have been offered a job to develop membership website for our Koperasi Freelancer Indonesia (KFI), I thought the timing is perfect if I blog my experience in developing it as my next tutorial series in this blog. With one interesting twist of plot : we are going to add another development platform, Python Tools for Visual Studio + Windows Azure. But still not forgetting those  who use *nix. In this series, we are going to see how well Windows Azure match up with Openshift in context of deploying Python web application.

Hence, welcome to the first installment of Pythonthusiast's Django Tutorial!

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