Part 4: Installing Prerequisites - Python, PyQt and PyCharm

Your first Python application for this series...

Your first Python application for this series...

Although in Part 5 of Developing Cross Platform Application using Qt, PyQt and PySide : GUI Application Development I already gave detailed steps on how to create Qt main window application, some readers still find it confusing. And someway I think they were right: that article was too confusing that it tries to compare C++ Qt, PyQt and PySide altogether. Some readers who asked me about how to start PyQt application, find that article is not much of a help. Therefore, in this article I am going to revisit that article and create a new one with this focus in mind : using PyQt 4, Qt Designer and PyCharm. I use Windows 8.1 to develop this application. For those who use other Operating System, feel free to adjust your working environment as needed.

The application itself, code named Northerd, as already mentioned in previous articles, is a productivity desktop application. It will sit in your system tray and assist you with any productivity tasks that I can think of and useful for my daily work.  It will have main window (of course), that how to build it, will be explained in great detail in this article.

If you are regular readers of this blog, I bet you have already know that the longest and completed tutorial series in this blog is the Flask Biography Application. What you are reading now, is future article series that will be in the same long and completeness as that Flask application. I hope you enjoyed this article series as much as you enjoyed The Flask tutorial series!

Great, lets get started!

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Part 3: [Addendum] How Python Organize Your Application Code

 

Modularization of Python Code (Image taken from here)

Modularization of Python Code
(Image taken from here)

I visioned that this article will be your first article in how to properly start coding in Python. And lets be brief in this: you are going to understand what does it means by the following three ways of organizing Python code:

  1. Module
  2. Package
  3. Class

All, through the eye of a Python programmer.

Those three terms are your fundamental key in understanding how to properly organize your Python application.

Great. Lets get started!

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Part 2: Reviving Microsoft Agent using PyWin32 - Run the Agent Hourly

 
Now the agent can run in specified time interval

Now the agent can run in a specified time interval

If you inspect closely our last article, you will realize that the Agent although having the ability to speak the time when you need it, it still unable to speak the time in specified interval, say, hourly. In this part of the article we are going to inspect whether we can easily add that ability.

Let's find out!

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Part 1: Reviving Microsoft Agent using PyWin32 - How to Make It Live!

 

I just found an MS Agent characters I haven't seen before, and though to share how to control them from within Python

I just found an MS Agent characters I haven't seen before, and though to share how to control them from within Python

I think this article was driven by the fact that this April, Microsoft discontinued Windows XP. And why is that related? Because if you remember Windows XP, somehow I think you will remember --maybe in annoyance-- this cute little dog called Rover from Windows XP Find Files bar:

Howdy, Rover?

Howdy, Rover? Not even you, now your master was also dead. So sad.. Frown

Long story short, Microsoft did not gain success with this MS Agent stuff. Without even realizing it, one of the first thing I do when re-installing Windows XP is ... get rid of Rover from Windows Explorer! And yeah, unfortunately, I am not the only one.

But still, in this article we are going to use it as a study case on how to properly use PyWin32, an amazing Python package from Mark Hammond, that let your Python application integrate tightly with Windows. For example, do you know that Dropbox client application was built with Python? Laughing

Great, lets dig more on this matter!

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